The University of Arizona Success Stories

Dr. Natasha Johnson was one of our first!

Dr. Natasha Johnson was one of our first!

Dr. Natasha Johnson was one of our first UA/NASA Space Grant Interns. She graduated from the University of Arizona in 1991 with BS degrees in Math, Geology, Computer Science and Physcis. She is currently working at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Extraterrestrial Physics as a National Research Council Resident Research Associate and has written many publications to support her work.

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Graduate Fellow Nick Rattray won a Fullbright

Graduate Fellow Nick Rattray won a Fullbright

UA/NASA Space Grant Graduate Fellow Nick Rattray was awared a Fulbright Grant to study disability issues in Ecuador.

Congradulations Nick!

Three UA Navajo Students Graduate With Ph.D. Degrees in Engineering

Three UA Navajo Students Graduate With Ph.D. Degrees in Engineering

1992-93 Space Grant Undergraduate Intern Julius Yellowhair graduates from the University of Arizona with a Ph.D. in Optical Sciences.

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Space Grant group helps build scientific knowledge

Space Grant group helps build scientific knowledge

"I was responsible for analyzing MRI scans of patients with brain tumors using an imaging software. I had to develop a new technique to look at areas of the brain for changes in before and after radiation treatment in an attempt to detect radiation effects." -Joshua Lucio

University of Arizona Space Grant Undergraduate Research Intern Joshua Lucio was featured in the Arizona Daily Star (4/18/07) written by Valarie Potell.

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Success Comes Early In Interns' Careers

Success Comes Early In Interns' Careers

University of Arizona Space Grant Undergraduate Research Intern David Zahn (2006-07) was awarded two distinctions soon into his first semester as an undergraduate research intern in our program.

The following link is to an excerpt from a letter from David to Susan Brew regarding his recent accomplishments and enthusiasm about the Space Grant program and how it has been a positive element of his semester so far!

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Daniella Giustina Awarded with NIAC Student Fellows Prize

Daniella Giustina Awarded with NIAC Student Fellows Prize

In May of 2006, 2005 UA/NASA Space Grant Undergraduate Research Intern Daniella Della Giustina, an engineering-physics major, was one of five students selected from across the nation to receive a prestigious $9,000 NASA Institute for Advanced Concepts (NIAC) Student Fellows Prize to investigate revolutionary ideas for space exploration. She will study the use of near-Earth asteroids for radiation shielding during a human journey to Mars in her prize-winning project titled "The Martian Bus Schedule: An Innovative Technique for Protecting Humans on a Journey to Mars." An extension to this accomplishment, Dani has been named "Student Principal Investigator" for the Discovery-class Osiris Mission, and will engage and lead a team of Space Grant students in her radiation shielding research.

Intern Designing the "New Space Shuttle" at Boeing

Intern Designing the "New Space Shuttle" at Boeing

Germán Fuentes, a 1999-00 Space Grant intern for Dr. Lesser graduated with a degree in Electrical Engineering in 2002. We were very pleased to receive a note from him this summer, to update us on his activities:

"I wanted to say thank you for the opportunity given to me 3 yrs. ago and offer a disposition of service to you and your program. Looking back, the Arizona Space Grant Consortium gave me a start in the space business and I am grateful for the early exposure.

My job at Boeing as an engineer focuses on the X-37 project. X-37 is an unmanned, experimental, space plane designed to test new technologies and progress towards NASA's vision of an Orbital Space Plane. I work with the avionics portion--specifically the communication systems. My day-to-day activities include writing test procedures for the communications system and then running the tests to see if our equipment is functioning properly. The work is exciting and I enjoy the Boeing atmosphere very much--Southern California isn't so bad either!"

Jenna Root Awarded 1st Place at the UA Student Showcase

Jenna Root Awarded 1st Place at the UA Student Showcase

University of Arizona Space Grant Undergraduate Research Intern Jenna Root (2005-06) was awarded 1st Place for her poster at the UA Student Showcase 2006. She competed in the Undergraduate Student Division in Agriculture and Environmental Sciences. She will be presenting her poster, "Assessing Carbon Dynamics of Coarse Woody Debris in Desert Grasslands" at the Annual Meetings of the Society for Range Management in Reno, NV in Feb 2007.

Launching UA Students from Research Labs to America's High Tech Workforce

Launching UA Students from Research Labs to America's High-Tech Workforce

The Arizona Space Grant Consortium is particularly proud of our statewide fellowships programs. From 1994 to 2002, 999 undergraduate students have participated in mentor-guided research internships in leading-edge scientific programs. A great enhancement to an education, internships contribute to the development of a technically informed, aware and sensitive citizenry--essential to the success of U.S. space endeavors, as well as to broader national priorities. 132 graduate students have received fellowships, propelling them towards careers in America's technical work force. 22% are from groups traditionally underrepresented in science and technical fields; 40% are women.

UA Intern in Driver's Seat of Mars Exploration Rover (MER)

UA Intern in Driver's Seat of Mars Exploration Rover (MER)

Chris Lewicki, was a 1993-94 Arizona Space Grant Intern, and a 1997-1999 Graduate Fellow--not to mention the first student manager of the UA Space Grant Student Satellite Program. He now serves as a member of the Mars Exploration Rovers Assembly, Test and Launch Operations team at JPL. In 2003, two new and powerful Mars "Robotic Geologists", developed by the MER team, will be sent to the red planet. With far greater mobility than the 1997 Mars Pathfinder rover, these rovers will be able to trek up to 100 meters (about 110 yards) per day across the Martian surface. These missions continue NASA's quest to understand the role of water on Mars. Chris is MER Mission Flight Director for the Impact to Egress phase. Chris is responsible for actually "steering" one of the rovers! How cool is that!?!?! For full details on this mission, along with a lot of great pictures, please go tohttp://www.jpl.nasa.gov/mer/1106_b231.cfm

View an article covering Chris's most recent trip to Arizona, where he was the featured keynote speaker for the 2005-2006 Arizona/NASA Space Grant Undergraduate Research Intern Annual Symposium! This link is featured in our articles page.

Also check out NASA's Offical Marsrover website.

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