Amanda Duron

Chelsea Page

Celeste Barajas

Eleisha Jackson

Mike Thomson, 2007 Space Grant Intern

Mike Thomson, 2007 Space Grant Intern

Mike Thomson, Space Grant Intern 2007-08, is working for General Dynamics C4 Systems to help create the fastest data encryption devices in the world. He is also attending Harvard University and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, which will culminate with a Master's degree from Harvard. Mike's next plan is to pursue a PhD - for which he, his wife and two children are currently making preparations. His academic research is focused on advanced computer architectures.

Joshua A. John, 2003 Space Grant Intern, 2005 NAU Grad

Joshua A. John, 2003 Space Grant Intern, 2005 NAU Grad

I currently work on the Exoatmospheric Kill Vehicle (EKV) program that is part of the Ground-based Midcourse Defense (GMD) system that is a segment of the U.S. missile defense system. The EKV is a vehicle that is carried upon a Boeing built booster and launched to intercept incoming ballistic missiles against the US or its allies.  I am a team member on a group called the Operations Test and Evaluation team. Our main task is to plan, execute, and analyze tests that are associated with the development of the EKV and GMD system, primarily flight and ground tests. I started with this team in January 2012 and my duty was to analyze post test data at ground tests performed at NASA’s White Sands Tests Facility (WSTF) in Las Cruces, NM. I primarily use MATLAB programming to analyze data, build scripts to process and plot data. The most nerve wracking and best part of the job is when the countdown starts to fire the thrusters and hope everything that you did works. I am glad to be part of this team because it contributes to the nation’s defense.

In addition to my primary work tasks, in 2011 I served as president of the Raytheon Missile Systems chapter of the Raytheon American Indian Network (RAIN), an employee resource group that is dedicated to the development of Native American employees at Raytheon and helps in career development, recruiting, and community service to the Tucson community. In parallel with my membership in RAIN, I am a professional member of the American Indian Science and Engineering Society (AISES). Our group helps college chapters by funding for conferences and outreach projects to K-12 students.

2007 NAU Space Grant Astronomy Intern Gregory Mace Takes Passion for Astronomy and Outreach to UCLA

Gregory Mace, 2007 Space Grant Intern, 2008 NAU Grad

While a student at NAU, Gregory Mace participated in two Space Grant Internships. He worked closely with Dr. Lisa Prato at Lowell Observatory to study young, low-mass stars. This work combined almost 20 years of astronomical observations and resulted in two published papers that reveal the gravitational interactions in two- and three-star systems.

Gregory is now a graduate student at UC Los Angeles and a Visiting Graduate Student Fellow at IPAC (the Infrared Processing and Analysis Center). As a member of the UCLA Infrared Laboratory he assembled, modified, and tested MOSFIRE (the Multi-Object Spectrometer for Infra-Red Exploration). This state-of-the-art Cassegrain instrument on the Keck I telescope allows astronomers to observe up to 46 objects simultaneously. These observations produce spectra, which reveal information about stellar composition, star formation, and distant galaxies. Working with the WISE (Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer) Brown Dwarf Team at IPAC, Gregory has observationally confirmed over 100 of the coolest brown dwarfs in the solar neighborhood. Also, as a graduate student he founded the award winning UCLA astronomy outreach group, Astronomy Live!. This student led group organizes school visits and the annual UCLA science day 'Exploring Your Universe'. For his work founding this group Gregory was awarded the Rudnick-Abelmann Scholarship by the UCLA Department of Physics and Astronomy.

Stargazer Program Opens New Horizons for Alaskan Student

Stargazer Program Opens New Horizons for Alaskan Student

Adam Nanouk travelled a great distance this summer--both physically and intellectually. His first trip away from his remote Alaskan village on the Bering Sea, took him all the way to Arizona to participate in Stargazer, a one-of-a-kind educational program for Native American high schoolers. Sponsored by the Space Grant Program at Northern Arizona University, Stargazer teams students with Ph.D. astronomers from Dinè (Tribal) College, Northern Arizona University, NASA scientists, and others, for an exciting week-long introduction to astronomy. News of Adam's acceptance to Stargazer stirred a great deal of excitement in his community--virtually everyone in the surrounding area attended his send-off party. The first leg of his journey--riding shuttles from home to the airport in Anchorage--was an adventure in itself. There, he reported seeing more people in one place than he could handle and nearly fainted! And that was nothing compared to what he would experience in Arizona!

Adam and his fellow students had opportunities to observe at state-of-the-art telescopes, construct and launch model rockets, and study star lore of different cultures in a star lab. They learned about astro-photography, spectroscopy, and CCD imaging, basic astronomical and physical principles, Native American astronomy, the scientific method, philosophy and ethics of science, and about telescopes, and how to use them. They took field trips to Lowell Observatory, the Astrogeology Branch of the U.S. Geological Survey, and an ancient archaeoastronomy site. Adam ate his first hamburger while on the NAU campus, saw his first ants while on a field trip, and got to wear his first NASA space suit. He said the trip opened his eyes to more possibilities than he ever imagined possible. His interest in space science was definitely sparked. Adam returned home with many stories for the people in his village--who will also, no doubt, marvel at what he has seen. We, in Arizona, anticipate seeing great things from Adam!

Jake Turner Helps Discover Possible Tropical Lakes on Titan

Monday, June 25, 2012
Jake Turner Helps Discover Possible Tropical Lakes on Titan

FY 2010 Space Grant Intern, Jake Turner, was one of the team members that helped to discover and characterize the first tropical methane lakes on Saturn's moon Titan using the Cassini spacecraft.

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