Call for Proposals -- NASA Research Announcement for Use of the NASA Physical Sciences Informatics System: Appendix B

NASA is seeking ground-based research proposals from graduate students to use NASA's Physical Sciences Informatics system to develop new analyses and scientific insights. The PSI system is designed to be a resource for researchers to data mine information generated from completed physical sciences experiments performed on the International Space Station or from related ground-based studies.

This solicitation appendix focuses on the following five research areas: combustion science, complex fluids, fluid physics, fundamental physics and materials science.

NASA is seeking ground-based research proposals from graduate students to use NASA's Physical Sciences Informatics system to develop new analyses and scientific insights. The PSI system is designed to be a resource for researchers to data mine information generated from completed physical sciences experiments performed on the International Space Station or from related ground-based studies.

This solicitation appendix focuses on the following five research areas: combustion science, complex fluids, fluid physics, fundamental physics and materials science.

For graduate students (students working toward an advanced degree), this NASA Research Announcement is soliciting proposals that advance fundamental research in one of the physical sciences disciplines identified above and also assist in the awarding of an advanced degree to the graduate student. This call is open to students who meet the following eligibility requirements:

-- The student is pursuing an advanced degree directly related to a physical sciences discipline -- only technical degrees are permitted (not degrees in policy or management).
-- The student is a U.S. citizen, a permanent resident alien of the U.S., or on a student visa at an accredited U.S. university at the time of application submission.
-- The student is enrolled in a master’s or doctoral degree program at an accredited U.S. university at the time of application submission, or, if the student is an undergraduate starting their graduate studies, he or she has been accepted to a master’s or doctoral degree program at an accredited U.S. university at the time of application submission and will start during the next academic year.
-- The student has an academic graduate advisor who will submit the application for the graduate student. The student must perform the proposed research under the guidance of the assigned graduate advisor.

The agency expects to make approximately 10-15 awards in spring 2016. Research and development efforts will take place over two years. The typical award will be $75,000-$100,000 per year, for up to two years.

The deadline for submitting proposals is March 17, 2016.

For information concerning this NASA Research Announcement solicitation, visit http://tinyurl.com/NASA-15PSI-B.

For more information about the Physical Science Informatics System, visit http://psi.nasa.gov .

Please direct questions about this NASA Research Announcement to Dr. Francis Chiaramonte at francis.p.chiaramonte@nasa.gov.

Additional technical information about the Physical Science Informatics System for this NASA Research Announcement is available from the contact below:

Name: Teresa Miller
Title: Physical Sciences Informatics System – Technical POC
NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center
Email: teresa.y.miller@nasa.gov
Phone: 256-544-7815

Deadline:

Monday, February 22, 2016

Opportunity Category:

2016 OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Promotion and Research Challenge

NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center is rolling out a new look and format for this year's spinoff challenge. The OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Promotion and Research Challenge, or OPSPARC, challenges students to help raise awareness and understanding of NASA technologies and their many benefits to our everyday lives.

NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center is rolling out a new look and format for this year's spinoff challenge. The OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Promotion and Research Challenge, or OPSPARC, challenges students to help raise awareness and understanding of NASA technologies and their many benefits to our everyday lives.

The newest incarnation of the challenge will provide contestants (students in grades 3 through 12) with a new tool, developed by Glogster, for creating and submitting their entries. Glogster is a cloud-based platform for presentation and interactive learning. The tool will allow contestants to combine different kinds of media on a virtual canvas to create multimedia posters and to access an existing library of educational content created by students and educators worldwide. Contestants will develop a Glog of their own as part of OPSPARC that will include information on spinoffs and NASA missions. The students also will create video describing their own ideas for a new NASA spinoff technology.

After completing their Glogs, 20 teams of students in grades 9 through 12 will be invited to work with college student mentors to further develop their spinoff concept within a 3-D, multi-user, virtual-world setting through creation of computer-aided design, or CAD, models and application of engineering and business analyses on their spinoff concepts. This year’s InWorld portion of the contest is being sponsored by NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope project.

Students who submit the winning entries in each age category will have the opportunity to visit NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, for an awards ceremony and workshop to be held in their honor. The workshop will include a behind-the-scenes look at Goddard, the chance to meet some of the top minds at NASA, and the opportunity for the students to design and create their own public service announcement video with guidance from NASA video producers and actor Peter Cullen, the voice of the TRANSFORMERS character OPTIMUS PRIME.

The deadline to register and submit Glogs is 11:59 PM EST on March 8, 2016.

To learn more about the challenge and to register to participate, visit http://itpo.gsfc.nasa.gov/opsparc/.

Please direct questions about this contest to Darryl Mitchell at Darryl.R.Mitchell@nasa.gov.

TRANSFORMERS and OPTIMUS PRIME are trademarks of Hasbro and are used with permission. © 2015 Hasbro. All rights reserved.

Deadline:

Tuesday, March 8, 2016

Opportunity Category:

Institute of Museum and Library Services Grants: STEM Expert Facilitation of Family Learning in Libraries and Museums

The Institute of Museum and Library Services seeks proposals for design-based research projects focused on inquiry-based STEM programs delivered by scientists, engineers, and related technical practitioners to children ages 6-10 and their families. Proposals should address the role of experts’ oral narratives (e.g., storytelling or personal histories) as part of object-based science inquiry and include information about how findings will be applicable in both museum and library settings.

The Institute of Museum and Library Services seeks proposals for design-based research projects focused on inquiry-based STEM programs delivered by scientists, engineers, and related technical practitioners to children ages 6-10 and their families. Proposals should address the role of experts’ oral narratives (e.g., storytelling or personal histories) as part of object-based science inquiry and include information about how findings will be applicable in both museum and library settings.

Entities that are eligible to apply include libraries, agencies, institutions of higher education, museums, and other entities that advance the museum and library fields. Grant amounts up to $1,000,000 are available for a period of performance up to two years.

Applications are due May 1, 2016.

For more information, visit https://www.imls.gov/grants/available/stem-expert-facilitation-family-learning-libraries-and-museums-stemex.

Informational webinars about this grant opportunity will be presented on Wednesday, Feb. 17, 2016, at 4 p.m. EST and on Thursday, Feb. 18, 2016, at 3 p.m. EST. Visit the link above for details on how to access the webinar.

Library representatives with questions about this opportunity should email Sandra Toro at storo@imls.gov. Museum representatives with questions should email Helen Wechsler at hwechsler@imls.gov or Sandra Narva at snarva@imls.gov.

Deadline:

Sunday, May 1, 2016

Opportunity Category:

White House Office of Science and Technology Policy's Summer 2016 Policy Internship Program

The White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, or OSTP, is seeking students for summer 2016 internships. The OSTP advises the President on the effects of science and technology on domestic and international affairs. The office serves as a source of scientific and technological analyses and judgment for the president with respect to major policies, plans and programs of the federal government.

The White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, or OSTP, is seeking students for summer 2016 internships. The OSTP advises the President on the effects of science and technology on domestic and international affairs. The office serves as a source of scientific and technological analyses and judgment for the president with respect to major policies, plans and programs of the federal government.

Policy internships are open to interested students from all majors and programs, including law school programs. Applicants must be U.S. citizens who are enrolled, at least half-time, in an accredited college or university during the period of volunteer service. Students in undergraduate, graduate and professional programs in all fields are encouraged to apply.

While these positions are without compensation, the assignments provide educational enrichment, practical work experience and networking opportunities with other individuals in the science and technology policy arena.

Applications for summer 2016 internships are due Feb. 26, 2016.

For more information, visit http://www.whitehouse.gov/administration/eop/ostp/about/student.

If you have questions about this opportunity, please contact Rebecca Grimm at rgrimm@ostp.eop.gov.

Deadline:

Friday, February 26, 2016

Opportunity Category:

‘Mosaics in Science’ Program

The National Park Service's ‘Mosaics in Science’ Diversity Internship Program provides college students and recent graduates who are underrepresented in STEM career fields with on-the-ground, science-based work experience related to natural resources in the National Park System.

The National Park Service's ‘Mosaics in Science’ Diversity Internship Program provides college students and recent graduates who are underrepresented in STEM career fields with on-the-ground, science-based work experience related to natural resources in the National Park System.

Participants spend 11 weeks working on a STEM project in a national park. After completing their projects, participants travel to the District of Columbia for a career workshop that provides opportunities to present their work, learn about how to apply for a federal job, and meet National Park Service staff and management. Participants receive a stipend of $4,800, plus housing and travel allowances.

To be eligible, applicants must be citizens or permanent residents of the United States between 18 and 35 years old. The applicants must attend or recently have graduated from an undergraduate institution, or they must be in the early stages of their career. Eligible students and young adults from groups historically underrepresented in STEM fields are strongly encouraged to seek nomination. These groups include but are not limited to African-American, American Indian/Alaska Native, Asian, Hispanic, and Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander.

Applications are due Feb. 19, 2016.

For more information, visit http://www.nature.nps.gov/geology/mosaics/.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to Lisa Norby at lisa_norby@nps.gov.

This program is run in partnership with Environment for the Americas and Greening Youth Foundation.

Deadline:

Friday, February 19, 2016

Opportunity Category:

2016 NASA Summer Faculty Fellowship Program Application Deadline

NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, is offering fellowships for qualified science, technology, mathematics and engineering faculty at U.S. colleges and universities. This program provides a 10-week summer residency at Marshall.

Applicants must be U.S. citizens who hold full-time teaching or research appointments at accredited universities or colleges in the United States. Women, underrepresented minorities and persons with disabilities are encouraged to apply.

NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, is offering fellowships for qualified science, technology, mathematics and engineering faculty at U.S. colleges and universities. This program provides a 10-week summer residency at Marshall.

Applicants must be U.S. citizens who hold full-time teaching or research appointments at accredited universities or colleges in the United States. Women, underrepresented minorities and persons with disabilities are encouraged to apply.

Faculty fellows receive stipends based on academic level. And fellows living more than 50 miles from Marshall will receive a relocation allowance of $1,500 and a $500 travel supplement for one round-trip.

The deadline for applications is Feb. 15, 2016. 

Deadline:

Monday, February 15, 2016

Opportunity Category:

Lunch with Christie Iacomini, Paragon Space Development Corp.!

AZ Space Grant Affiliate representative and UA graduate Dr. Christie Iacomini will lead a conversation with Space Grant students over a (program provided!!!) lunch in the Student Union’s Arizona Room. You will learn about Paragon Space Development Corporation, the types of work carried out there, what they look for in future employees and receive advice about how to best prepare for jobs in Arizona’s research sector!

Lunch and discussion with Mark Sykes, Planetary Science Inst.

AZ Space Grant Affiliate representative Dr. Mark V. Sykes, CEO & Director of the Planetary Science Institute (PSI), the largest non-governmental employer of planetary scientists in the world, will lead a conversation with Space Grant students over a (program provided!!!) lunch in the Student Union’s Arizona Room. You will learn about PSI, the types of work carried out there, what they look for in future employees and receive advice about how to best prepare for jobs in Arizona’s research sector!

NASA Science Mission Directorate -- Summer 2016 Space Grant Internships

NASA's Science Mission Directorate is looking to fill Space Grant-sponsored internships for summer 2016 sessions. Internship opportunities are available with three NASA missions.

NASA's Science Mission Directorate is looking to fill Space Grant-sponsored internships for summer 2016 sessions. Internship opportunities are available with three NASA missions.

Chandra X-Ray Observatory
Launched in 1999, Chandra is one of NASA's Great Observatories and continues to be a major research tool for X-ray astronomy. Chandra has internship opportunities available assisting two different teams. Applicants may choose to assist the Flight Operations team or the Integration team. Both opportunities involve working to enhance ground system software to support flight operations of NASA's Chandra spacecraft. Interns will work side-by-side with engineers at the Chandra Operations Control Center in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Space Telescope Science Institute
The Space Telescope Science Institute, located in Baltimore, Maryland, is one of the world's premiere astronomical research institutions. It is the science operations center for NASA's Hubble Space Telescope and its future successor, the James Webb Space Telescope. The institute is seeking a summer intern to work on developing education products in the Office of Public Outreach.

OSIRIS-REx
NASA has awarded a contract to the University of Arizona in Tucson to lead OSIRIS-REx, the first U.S. asteroid sample-return mission. OSIRIS-REx is part of the NASA New Frontiers Program of solar system exploration. This summer, the mission will be ramping up to its September launch, and its Communications and Public Engagement office is seeking an intern to support the mission's pre-launch communications activities. The team will be producing a communications campaign involving video and graphics products. Applicants should have writing, art and videography skills to create products for this campaign.

Applicants for these internships must be U.S. citizens. Individual Space Grants will submit names and application materials for students interested in applying for these internships. Applications should be submitted via the home Space Grant organization of the applicant (either the applicant's home state or where the applicant attends school). Note that, because of funding constraints, not all Space Grants are participating.

Application materials are due Feb. 8, 2016.

For a list of Space Grant contacts and websites, visithttp://www.nasa.gov/offices/education/programs/national/spacegrant/home/Space_Grant_Consortium_Websites.html.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to Dr. Terry Teays at tteays1@jhu.edu.

Deadline:

Monday, February 8, 2016

Opportunity Category:

2016 NASA Aeronautics Design Challenge: Distributed Electric Propulsion

Distributed Electric Propulsion, or DEP, is an emerging aircraft design concept that has the potential to improve aircraft performance in a number of areas, including efficiency, takeoff and landing performance, emissions, noise abatement, safety, and ride quality. DEP also has the potential to enable new novel control systems. In this year's NASA Aeronautics Design Challenge, student teams are challenged to design a commuter aircraft that applies DEP technology.

Distributed Electric Propulsion, or DEP, is an emerging aircraft design concept that has the potential to improve aircraft performance in a number of areas, including efficiency, takeoff and landing performance, emissions, noise abatement, safety, and ride quality. DEP also has the potential to enable new novel control systems. In this year's NASA Aeronautics Design Challenge, student teams are challenged to design a commuter aircraft that applies DEP technology. The main source of thrust for the students’ concept may come from DEP or a combination of DEP and conventional propulsion devices (turboprops, turbofans, etc.). The challenge for the design team is to determine the most advantageous application of DEP for their aircraft and to justify their selection.

The contest is open to teams of full-time students enrolled in higher education institutions of the United States or its territories. This category includes universities, colleges, trade schools, community colleges, professional schools, etc. Multidisciplinary teams are encouraged.

Final entries are due May 16, 2016.

For more information and a complete list of rules, visit http://aero.larc.nasa.gov/university-contest/.

Questions about the challenge should be directed to Elizabeth Ward at Elizabeth.B.Ward@nasa.gov.

Deadline:

Monday, May 16, 2016

Opportunity Category:

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