White House Office of Science and Technology Policy's Spring 2016 Policy Internship Program

The White House Office of Science and Technology Policy is seeking students for spring 2016 internships. The OSTP advises the President on the effects of science and technology on domestic and international affairs. The office serves as a source of scientific and technological analyses and judgment for the president with respect to major policies, plans and programs of the federal government.

The White House Office of Science and Technology Policy is seeking students for spring 2016 internships. The OSTP advises the President on the effects of science and technology on domestic and international affairs. The office serves as a source of scientific and technological analyses and judgment for the president with respect to major policies, plans and programs of the federal government.

Policy internships are open to interested students from all majors and programs, including law school programs. Applicants must be U.S. citizens who are enrolled, at least half-time, in an accredited college or university during the period of volunteer service. Students in undergraduate, graduate and professional programs in all fields are encouraged to apply.

While these positions are without compensation, the assignments provide educational enrichment, practical work experience and networking opportunities with other individuals in the science and technology policy arena.

Applications for spring 2016 internships are due Oct. 30, 2015.

For more information, visit http://www.whitehouse.gov/administration/eop/ostp/about/student.

If you have questions about this opportunity, please contact Rebecca Grimm at Rebecca_L_Grimm@ostp.eop.gov.

Deadline:

Friday, October 30, 2015

Opportunity Category:

National Science Foundation's East Asia and Pacific Summer Institutes Fellowship Program

The National Science Foundation is accepting applications for its East Asia and Pacific Summer Institutes, or EAPSI, Fellowship Program. This program provides U.S. graduate students in science, engineering and education with an opportunity to spend eight weeks during the summer conducting research at one of seven host locations in East Asia and the Pacific. Host locations are Australia, China, Japan, Korea, New Zealand, Singapore and Taiwan. The program is a collaboration between NSF and counterpart agencies in each host location.

The National Science Foundation is accepting applications for its East Asia and Pacific Summer Institutes, or EAPSI, Fellowship Program. This program provides U.S. graduate students in science, engineering and education with an opportunity to spend eight weeks during the summer conducting research at one of seven host locations in East Asia and the Pacific. Host locations are Australia, China, Japan, Korea, New Zealand, Singapore and Taiwan. The program is a collaboration between NSF and counterpart agencies in each host location.

EAPSI is open to graduate students who are U.S. citizens or permanent residents and are enrolled in a research-oriented master's or doctoral program in science or engineering. Applicants must propose a research project in a science, technology, engineering or mathematics field supported by NSF. Applicants identify and contact host researchers on their own prior to submitting their EAPSI proposals. Lists of prospective host institutions are available at the opportunity website.

NSF provides EAPSI Fellows with a $5,000 stipend and roundtrip airplane ticket to the host location. The program's foreign counterparts provide in-country living expenses and accommodations. (Arrangements vary by host location.)

The application submission deadline for summer 2016 is Nov. 12, 2015.

For additional information about the program, including location-specific handbooks, a How to Apply guide and helpful tips for applicants, visit www.nsf.gov/eapsi.

An EAPSI Informational Webinar will be conducted on Friday, Oct. 23, 2015, at 2 p.m. EDT. Log-in instructions are available at www.nsf.gov/eapsi.

Questions about this fellowship opportunity should be directed to eapsi@nsf.gov.

Deadline:

Thursday, November 12, 2015

Opportunity Category:

NASA In Situ Resource Utilization Challenge

Living off the land is different when the land is 140 million miles away, so NASA is looking for innovative ideas to use in situ (in place) Martian resources to help establish a human presence on Mars.

The In Situ Resource Utilization Challenge offers the public an opportunity to submit designs for structures on the Red Planet that would use existing material. The agency plans to award $10,000 to the first-place winner, with $2,500 each for two second-place submissions.

Living off the land is different when the land is 140 million miles away, so NASA is looking for innovative ideas to use in situ (in place) Martian resources to help establish a human presence on Mars.

The In Situ Resource Utilization Challenge offers the public an opportunity to submit designs for structures on the Red Planet that would use existing material. The agency plans to award $10,000 to the first-place winner, with $2,500 each for two second-place submissions.

One advantage of using Martian resources instead of bringing everything from Earth is the potential to save more than $100,000 per 2.2 pounds (1 kilogram) of cargo each launch.

The challenge is run by NineSigma Inc. as part of the NASA Tournament Lab. The NTL works across NASA and the federal government to provide crowd-based challenges as a way to solve difficult problems and get work done. The In Situ Resource Utilization Challenge is being conducted in collaboration with Swamp Works, a lab at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida dedicated to finding creative solutions for the problems that come with deep space exploration, including the Journey to Mars.

Entries are due Dec. 3, 2015. For more information about the challenge and how to enter, visit http://go.nasa.gov/1L4MSP6.

For more information about NASA's Journey to Mars, visit http://www.nasa.gov/topics/journeytomars.

Deadline:

Thursday, December 3, 2015

Opportunity Category:

Reed, Emma

Biosphere 2 (B2) is a three-acre recreation of Earth’s diverse biomes, and serves as a hub for science education and student research.  Many of its younger visitors have never visited the ocean, and B2 provides their first introduction to marine ecosystems.  I am expanding B2’s K-12 ocean sciences curriculum to include modules on marine pollution and ocean acidification.  Students will engage in hands-on experiences, from tracking plastic debris in the Biosphere ocean to using ROV’s to survey ocean life.  They will explore the broader implications of their activities for the future of ocean

Emma Reed

Biosphere 2 (B2) is a three-acre recreation of Earth’s diverse biomes, and serves as a hub for science education and student research.  Many of its younger visitors have never visited the ocean, and B2 provides their first introduction to marine ecosystems.  I am expanding B2’s K-12 ocean sciences curriculum to include modules on marine pollution and ocean acidification.  Students will engage in hands-on experiences, from tracking plastic debris in the Biosphere ocean to using ROV’s to survey ocean life.  They will explore the broader implications of their activities for the future of ocean ecosystems, and how students can shape that future, whether by simply recycling, or by becoming scientists themselves.  Ultimately, this curriculum will help students connect the distant ocean—the source of Arizona’s rainfall and the driver of the Sonoran Desert’s diversity—with their own lives.

Year
2015

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