2016 RASC-AL Robo-Ops Competition

NASA and the National Institute of Aerospace announce the 2016 Revolutionary Aerospace Systems Concepts-Academic Linkage Exploration Robo-Ops, also known as the RASC-AL Robo-Ops, competition. This design competition is aimed at university-level engineering students.

NASA and the National Institute of Aerospace announce the 2016 Revolutionary Aerospace Systems Concepts-Academic Linkage Exploration Robo-Ops, also known as the RASC-AL Robo-Ops, competition. This design competition is aimed at university-level engineering students.

The Robo-Ops contest challenges participants to build a planetary rover prototype and demonstrate its capabilities in field tests at NASA's Johnson Space Center’s Rock Yard. Up to three members of the team (plus the faculty advisor) may travel to Johnson for the onsite testing. The remaining team members will stay behind at the local university to conduct mission control tasks. The prototype rovers will be tele-operated by the mission control team members and must negotiate a series of obstacles while accomplishing a variety of tasks that include sample collection and acquisition. The only information available to the rover controller to perform the required tasks will be information transmitted through onboard rover video camera(s), microphone(s), or other onboard sensors.

Interested teams are encouraged to submit a notice of intent by Sept. 23, 2015, and teams must submit a project plan for their proposed project by Oct. 3, 2015.

The Robo-Ops Steering Committee of NASA experts will evaluate the project plans and select up to eight teams to compete against each other at the Rock Yard in late May 2016. Each of the selected teams will be provided with a $10,000 stipend to develop their rover.

The Robo-Ops competition is open to full-time undergraduate or graduate students majoring in engineering, science or related disciplines at an accredited university. University design teams must include one faculty or industry advisor with a university affiliation and two or more undergraduate or graduate students. Multidisciplinary teams are encouraged. 

For more information about this competition, visit http://robo-ops.nianet.org.

If you have questions about this competition, please contact the RASC-AL team at rascal@nianet.org.

Deadline:

Wednesday, September 23, 2015

Opportunity Category:

Call for Proposals -- NASA Research Announcement for Use of the NASA Physical Sciences Informatics System: Appendix A

NASA is seeking ground-based research proposals from graduate students to use NASA's Physical Sciences Informatics system to develop new analyses and scientific insights. The PSI system is designed to be a resource for researchers to data mine information generated from completed physical sciences experiments performed on the International Space Station or from related ground-based studies.

This solicitation appendix focuses on the following five research areas: combustion science, complex fluids, fluid physics, fundamental physics and materials science.

NASA is seeking ground-based research proposals from graduate students to use NASA's Physical Sciences Informatics system to develop new analyses and scientific insights. The PSI system is designed to be a resource for researchers to data mine information generated from completed physical sciences experiments performed on the International Space Station or from related ground-based studies.

This solicitation appendix focuses on the following five research areas: combustion science, complex fluids, fluid physics, fundamental physics and materials science.

For graduate students (students working towards an advanced degree), this NASA Research Announcement is soliciting proposals that advance fundamental research in one of the physical sciences disciplines identified above and also assist in the awarding of an advanced degree to the graduate student. This call is open to students who meet the following eligibility requirements:
-- The student is pursuing an advanced degree directly related to a physical sciences discipline -- only technical degrees are permitted (not degrees in policy or management).
-- The student is a U.S. citizen, a permanent resident alien of the U.S., or on a student visa at an accredited U.S. university at the time of application submission.
-- The student is enrolled in a master’s or doctoral degree program at an accredited U.S. university at the time of application submission, or, if the student is an undergraduate starting their graduate studies, he or she has been accepted to a master’s or doctoral degree program at an accredited U.S. university at the time of application submission and will start during the next academic year.
-- The student has an academic graduate advisor who will submit the application for the graduate student. The student must perform the proposed research under the guidance of the assigned graduate advisor.

The agency expects to make approximately 10-15 awards in early 2016, The award for each proposal selected from this Appendix will be $50,000 – $75,000 per year, for a total maximum award amount up to $150,000 for a two-year period. Research and development efforts will take place over two years.

The deadline for submitting proposals is Sept. 30, 2015.

For information concerning this NASA Research Announcement solicitation, visithttp://nspires.nasaprs.com/external/solicitations/summary.do?method=init&solId={88074AD3-2C25-81A8-6EED-D87C6C7459D1}&path=open.

For more information about the Physical Science Informatics System, visit http://psi.nasa.gov/home.aspx.

Please direct questions about this NASA Research Announcement to Dr. Francis Chiaramonte atfrancis.p.chiaramonte@nasa.gov.

Additional technical information about the Physical Science Informatics System for this NASA Research Announcement is available from:

Name: Teresa Miller
Title: Physical Sciences Informatics System – Technical POC
NASA Marshall Space Flight Center
Email: teresa.y.miller@nasa.gov
Phone: 256-544-7815

Deadline:

Wednesday, September 30, 2015

Opportunity Category:

Louisiana Tech University Online Course -- Steps to STEM: NASA Education Resources for STEM Engagement

Louisiana Tech University is teaming up with NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center to offer a 10-week course for educators interested in putting a space-themed twist on learning. The course is a self-paced, online professional development experience focusing on science, technology, engineering and mathematics education resources available from NASA. These resources have application methods for grades 4-9 with the goal of advancing high-quality STEM education using NASA's unique capabilities.

Applications are due Sept. 4, 2015.

Louisiana Tech University is teaming up with NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center to offer a 10-week course for educators interested in putting a space-themed twist on learning. The course is a self-paced, online professional development experience focusing on science, technology, engineering and mathematics education resources available from NASA. These resources have application methods for grades 4-9 with the goal of advancing high-quality STEM education using NASA's unique capabilities.

Applications are due Sept. 4, 2015.

For more information and to enroll in the course, visithttp://education.latech.edu/departments/science_technology_education_center/opeo.php.

Please direct requests for a course syllabus and additional information to Amy McDowell at amy.mcdowell@nasa.gov.

Deadline:

Friday, September 4, 2015

Opportunity Category:

Undergraduate Student Instrument Project (USIP) – 2015 Proposal Deadline

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) Science Mission Directorate (SMD), in collaboration with the Office of Education (OE) National Space Grant College and Fellowship Program (Space Grant) will release the Undergraduate Student Instrument Project (USIP) Student Flight Research Opportunity (SFRO) on or about August 21. USIP-2015 solicits proposals from U.S.

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) Science Mission Directorate (SMD), in collaboration with the Office of Education (OE) National Space Grant College and Fellowship Program (Space Grant) will release the Undergraduate Student Instrument Project (USIP) Student Flight Research Opportunity (SFRO) on or about August 21. USIP-2015 solicits proposals from U.S. institutions of higher education to develop an undergraduate-led Project Team that will fly a science and/or technology payload relevant to NASA strategic goals and objectives on a sounding rocket, balloon, aircraft, suborbital reusable launch vehicle (sRLV), or CubeSat launched on an orbital launch vehicle (hereafter referred to collectively as suborbital-class platforms).

The cost cap for an investigation awarded by OE is $200K, including the design, development, integration, and testing of the payload; student internships; and research on key innovative technologies. OE funding is limited to consortia of the National Space Grant College and Fellowship Program (Space Grant). See Appendix E for proposal conditions and guidelines for Space Grant consortia.

The cost cap for an investigation awarded by SMD is $100K, including the design, development, integration, testing of the payload; and student internships. SMD funding is available to all U.S. institutions of higher education.

Funding by NASA may be supplemented with contributions by the implementing institution (no limit); however, there are no expectations as to the amount of the institutional contribution and such contributions will not be considered in the evaluation of proposals. The selected projects must be launch-ready within 18 months of project initiation. SMD and OE estimate total funding available for award at $6.0M, and expect to select at least 30 projects for implementation, subject to available funding. The launch/flight services are provided by NASA at no cost to the project. Proposals to the USIP 2017 Solar Eclipse solicitation are not eligible for award under USIP-2015.

The two goals of this USIP SFRO are:

  • To provide a hands-on flight project experience to enhance the science, technical, leadership, and project skills for the selected undergraduate student team.
  • To fly a science and/or technology investigation relevant to NASA strategic goals and objectives on a suborbital-class platform. 

The key dates of this solicitation are:

SFRO Release Date                                     August 21, 2015
Question and Answer Telecon                   September 10, 2015 (2:00 PM)
Notice of Intent Deadline                           October 1, 2015 (11:59 PM)
Proposal Submittal Deadline                     November 20, 2015 (11:59 PM)
Selections Announced (target)                 December, 2015
Launch Readiness                                        August 1, 2017

The solicitation may be found on NSPIRES at http://nspires.nasaprs.com/external/solicitations/solicitations.do?method=open by searching on NNH15ZDA010C

General questions concerning this solicitation may be directed to:
David Pierce
Senior Program Executive for Suborbital Research
Science Mission Directorate
NASA Headquarters
Phone: (202) 358-3808
E-mail: david.l.pierce@nasa.gov

Questions specifically concerning the Space Grant component of this solicitation may be directed to:
Dr. Lenell Allen
Director, Aerospace Research and Career Development (ARCD)
Office of Education
NASA Headquarters
Phone: (202) 358-1762
E-mail: hq-space-grant@mail.nasa.gov

Deadline:

Friday, November 20, 2015

Opportunity Category:

Space Grant Internship Orientation

Welcome and congratulations on becoming a UA Space Grant Intern! Now it's time to get you acquainted with how the program works!

You will be given your research mentor's name and research project summary at the orientation meeting as well as the name of your Intern advisor. Intern advisors are prior Space Grant Interns who will stay in communication with you and your mentor throughout the year, help set-up activities of interest to the group, and generally work with you and the program managers to help insure your experience is a positive one. 

Space Grant Internship Orientation

Welcome and congratulations on becoming a UA Space Grant Intern! Now it's time to get you acquainted with how the program works!

You will be given your research mentor's name and research project summary at the orientation meeting as well as the name of your Intern advisor. Intern advisors are prior Space Grant Interns who will stay in communication with you and your mentor throughout the year, help set-up activities of interest to the group, and generally work with you and the program managers to help insure your experience is a positive one. 

Space Grant Biosphere 2 Tour

We will tour inside and under-the-glass where we’ll smell the ocean, see a tropical rainforest up close, visit the upper plant-filled biomes and the basement “technosphere” with the amazing lungs that moderated air pressure in the sealed environment. Our tour will conclude in an underwater ocean viewing gallery where we can explore the million-gallon ocean and its real coral reef. Discover real-time research on our planet's future as it unfolds in this specially designed mini-world.

Minorities Striving and Pursuing Higher Degrees of Success in Geosciences Research Experiences for Undergraduates Professional Development Program

The Institute for Broadening Participation is accepting applications for the Minorities Striving and Pursuing Higher Degrees of Success in Geosciences Research Experiences for Undergraduates (MS PHD’S-GEO REU) Professional Development Program.

The Institute for Broadening Participation is accepting applications for the Minorities Striving and Pursuing Higher Degrees of Success in Geosciences Research Experiences for Undergraduates (MS PHD’S-GEO REU) Professional Development Program.

The MS PHD’S-GEO REU program is designed specifically for underrepresented minority undergraduates who have participated in a recent National Science Foundation Research Experience for Undergraduates, or NSF REU, program in one of the following disciplines: Earth sciences, ocean sciences, polar sciences, or atmospheric and geospace sciences. Consideration also will be given to applicants who have completed REUs in other STEM fields (e.g., environmental engineering, ecology, computational mathematics, etc.) and who demonstrate strong interest in the geosciences and articulate potential benefits received as participants in this program.

For Phase I of the program, participants will attend the December 2015 American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting. During the AGU Fall Meeting, participants will engage in virtual and on-site professional development, and participate in networking, community building and mentoring activities. Financial support to attend the AGU Fall Meeting will be provided.

During Phase II of the program, participants engage in additional virtual and face-to-face activities designed to provide insight and information into geosciences professions and opportunities; promote ongoing engagement with geoscience professionals; and facilitate additional mentoring, professional development and networking opportunities at discipline-specific conferences and meetings.

Applications are due Sept. 14, 2015. For more information and to fill out an application, visithttp://www.msphds.org/GEOREU.aspx.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to pdp@msphds.org.

Deadline:

Monday, September 14, 2015

Opportunity Category:

Join NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement Mission's Master Teachers Cohort for the 2015-2016 School Year

NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement, or GPM, mission is looking for a small cadre of "GPM Master Teachers" to help develop and pilot science, technology, engineering and mathematics lessons to be used with elementary, middle and high school audiences.

Selected teachers will earn a stipend for their participation, which will run from Sept. 1, 2015, through June 30, 2016. All training and participation will take place online. It is anticipated that teachers will spend approximately 10 hours per month working on this collaborative project.

NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement, or GPM, mission is looking for a small cadre of "GPM Master Teachers" to help develop and pilot science, technology, engineering and mathematics lessons to be used with elementary, middle and high school audiences.

Selected teachers will earn a stipend for their participation, which will run from Sept. 1, 2015, through June 30, 2016. All training and participation will take place online. It is anticipated that teachers will spend approximately 10 hours per month working on this collaborative project.

This competitive opportunity is open to elementary, middle and high school teachers. GPM is seeking "master" teachers (those who have successfully taught for at least five years and who have demonstrated the ability to collaborate in professional learning communities within their school district and/or at the state/national level).

Applications are due Aug. 17, 2015.

For more information, visit http://1.usa.gov/1KcIQZd.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to Dorian Janney at dorian.w.janney@nasa.gov.

Deadline:

Monday, August 17, 2015

Opportunity Category:

2016 RASC-AL Aerospace Concepts Design Competition

NASA and the National Institute of Aerospace announce the 2016 Revolutionary Aerospace Systems Concepts-Academic Linkage Aerospace Concepts competition. RASC-AL is a design project competition for university-level engineering students and faculty.

NASA and the National Institute of Aerospace announce the 2016 Revolutionary Aerospace Systems Concepts-Academic Linkage Aerospace Concepts competition. RASC-AL is a design project competition for university-level engineering students and faculty.

The 2016 RASC-AL competition challenges participants to design projects based on real NASA problems by responding to one of four themes:
-- Crew-Tended Co-Orbiting ISS (International Space Station) Facility
-- Lunar Ice-Trap ISRU (In-Situ Resource Utilization) Mining, Processing and Storage Facility
-- Crewed Mars Moons Mission
-- Earth-Independent 1G Space Station

NASA could potentially implement concepts derived from the design projects.

Interested teams are encouraged to submit a notice of intent by Nov. 9, 2015, and teams must submit an abstract for their proposed project by Jan. 17, 2016.

For the first time, the 2016 RASC-AL Competition will include a two-tiered down-select process. The RASC-AL Steering Committee of NASA and industry experts will evaluate the abstract proposals and select as many as 20 undergraduate or graduate teams to move to the next phase of the competition. Based on evaluation of three-page midproject papers submitted by these teams in mid-March, the field will be narrowed once again to 14-16 teams who will be selected for the final round of the competition. These teams will present their concepts to the panel of judges (the RASC-AL Steering Committee) at the RASC-AL Forum in June 2016 in Florida.

The RASC-AL competition is open to full-time undergraduate or graduate students majoring in engineering or science at an accredited college or university. University design teams must include one faculty or industry advisor with a university affiliation and two or more undergraduate or graduate students. A group of universities also may collaborate on a design project entry. Multidisciplinary teams are encouraged.

For more information about this competition, visit http://rascal.nianet.org.

If you have questions about this competition, please contact the RASC-AL team at rascal@nianet.org.

Deadline:

Sunday, January 17, 2016

Opportunity Category:

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