REGISTRATION OPEN: Zero Robotics High School Tournament 2016

The Zero Robotics High School Tournament 2016 will take place this fall.

The Zero Robotics High School Tournament 2016 will take place this fall.
The tournament will offer U.S. high school students the opportunity to design experiments that will be tested in space. Zero Robotics challenges high school student teams to write their own algorithms to fly the Synchronized, Position, Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES. The competition starts online where, guided by mentors, teams compete to solve an annual challenge. Students can create, edit, share, save, simulate and submit code from a web browser. After several phases of virtual competition, finalists will be selected to compete virtually in a live championship aboard the International Space Station.

Registration closes on Sept. 28, 2016.

For more information about the tournament and to register your team to participate, visit http://zerorobotics.mit.edu/.

The competition began with a live webcast kickoff from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology on Sept. 10, 2016. Visit the Zero Robotics website to watch an archived video of the kickoff event.

Please email any questions about this opportunity to zerorobotics@mit.edu.

Deadline:

Wednesday, September 28, 2016

Opportunity Category:

2016 Space Grant Icebreaker for Interns and Fellows

On Friday, September 23 from 4:45-6:45 PM, you are cordially invited to join us at Flandrau Planetarium to meet the FY 2016 Space Grant Interns and Graduate Fellows, eat lots of pizza, and celebrate the new academic year! After socializing over pizza, we'll see a FullDome show, "Touring the Solar System", in the newly renovated planetarium theater. Please respond to this scheduling poll by Monday, 9/19, so we can reserve show seats and order food!

Gebhardt, Martha

In addition to working on my PhD (studying soil microbial communities and their interactions with plants) I have been running educational programming down at the Santa Rita Experimental Range since 2014. Through this position I have seen first hand the benefits (and challenges) of engaging students in STEM inquiry-based education. With the NASA Space Grant, I am working with high school teachers, university professors and other STEM professionals to develop hands-on curriculum teachers can easily implement into their classrooms.

Gebhardt, Martha

In addition to working on my PhD (studying soil microbial communities and their interactions with plants) I have been running educational programming down at the Santa Rita Experimental Range since 2014. Through this position I have seen first hand the benefits (and challenges) of engaging students in STEM inquiry-based education. With the NASA Space Grant, I am working with high school teachers, university professors and other STEM professionals to develop hands-on curriculum teachers can easily implement into their classrooms. Developing the lessons with teachers helps to ensure that they align with state standards and contain all necessary information needed to help both students and teachers understand core concepts. STEM experts are involved in lesson development to verify lesson material and ensure comprehensive coverage of various STEM topics and career opportunities in STEM. Complementary videos are developed in tandem with lessons to help explain difficult concepts. All lessons and supplemental materials will be made pubically available online with embedded survey metrics to monitor website activity and facilitate maximum impact. 

Year
2016

Fandel, Chloe

Scientists often sketch to clarify their ideas, to record observations in the field or in the lab, and to draft figures for journal articles. Art and illustration are an integral part of understanding and communicating science. Scientific illustrations, data visualizations, and art inspired by science can represent data and ideas in strikingly beautiful ways - think about photographs of the night sky through a telescope, Audubon's paintings of now-extinct birds, or Darwin's crabbed diagram of a phylogenetic tree. And yet, drawing is often left out of science education.

Fandel, Chloe

Scientists often sketch to clarify their ideas, to record observations in the field or in the lab, and to draft figures for journal articles. Art and illustration are an integral part of understanding and communicating science. Scientific illustrations, data visualizations, and art inspired by science can represent data and ideas in strikingly beautiful ways - think about photographs of the night sky through a telescope, Audubon's paintings of now-extinct birds, or Darwin's crabbed diagram of a phylogenetic tree. And yet, drawing is often left out of science education.

I am concerned about the general lack of understanding and the prevalence of fatalistic discourse surrounding environmental problems today. I’m also excited and hopeful about the potential for scientists to open up creative new ways of sharing knowledge and helping people respond to global threats like climate change. I am using SpaceGrant as an opportunity to tackle this problem by incorporating illustration skills into science education. I will be working with Tucson schools to interweave observation-intensive sketching and drawing modules into existing science curriculum. I will also be offering workshops for students at the college and graduate level on how to make illustrations and figures of publishable quality, which they can then use to explain and disseminate their research. Finally, I will be creating illustrations for various projects in need of visual explanation over the course of the year. If you are interested in any of these, please contact me at cfandel@email.arizona.edu.

Year
2016

Webb, Michaela

Michaela Webb is a University of Arizona Junior majoring in Journalism. She works with Shelley Littin from CyVerse on “Media Relations and Communications for CyVerse.”

Webb, Michaela

Michaela Webb is a University of Arizona Junior majoring in Journalism. She works with Shelley Littin from CyVerse on “Media Relations and Communications for CyVerse.”

Year
2016

Winner, Ian

Ian Winner is a University of Arizona/College of Science Senior majoring in Astronomy. He works with Gijs Mulders from LPL on “The planet-forming environment around a young star.”

Winner, Ian

Ian Winner is a University of Arizona/College of Science Senior majoring in Astronomy. He works with Gijs Mulders from LPL on “The planet-forming environment around a young star.”

Year
2016
Peer Tutor Topics
Astronomy, Math, Physics

2017 BIG Idea Challenge

NASA’s Game Changing Development Program and the National Institute of Aerospace announce the 2017 Breakthrough, Innovative, and Game-changing Idea Challenge. The BIG Idea Challenge invites teams and their faculty advisors to work together to design and analyze potential modular concepts and systems that provide the ability to construct large solar electric propulsion, or SEP, tugs in space that can transfer payloads for low Earth orbit to a lunar distant retrograde orbit.

NASA’s Game Changing Development Program and the National Institute of Aerospace announce the 2017 Breakthrough, Innovative, and Game-changing Idea Challenge. The BIG Idea Challenge invites teams and their faculty advisors to work together to design and analyze potential modular concepts and systems that provide the ability to construct large solar electric propulsion, or SEP, tugs in space that can transfer payloads for low Earth orbit to a lunar distant retrograde orbit. Concepts can employ new approaches for packaging modules in one or more launch vehicles that minimize launch loads; modular (distributed) solar arrays and ion engines; and robust robotic assembly (joining) of the modules that form the SEP tug.

Interested teams of three to five undergraduate and/or graduate students will submit proposals (eight to10 pages) describing their BIG Idea. Based on a review of the proposals, four teams will be selected to submit full technical papers and present their concepts to a panel of NASA judges at the 2017 BIG Idea Forum at NASA's Langley Research Center on Feb. 15 and 16, 2017, in Hampton, Virginia.

The final four qualifying teams will receive a $6,000 stipend to facilitate participation in the BIG Idea Forum. The winning team will receive offers to participate in paid internships with the Game Changing Development team at Langley Research Center where they can work toward further developing their concept under the mentorship of NASA experts.

Interested teams are encouraged to submit a notice of intent by Sept 30, 2016, and teams must submit proposals by Nov. 30, 2016.

For full competition details, including design constraints and submission guidelines, please visit http://BigIdea.nianet.org.

If you have any questions about the competition, please contact BigIdea@nianet.org.

Deadline:

Friday, September 30, 2016

Opportunity Category:

National Science Foundation's Historically Black Colleges and Universities -- Undergraduate Program

The National Science Foundation is seeking proposals for the Historically Black Colleges and Universities -- Undergraduate Program. HBCU-UP is committed to enhancing the quality of undergraduate STEM education and research at Historically Black Colleges and Universities as a means to broaden participation in the nation's STEM workforce.

The National Science Foundation is seeking proposals for the Historically Black Colleges and Universities -- Undergraduate Program. HBCU-UP is committed to enhancing the quality of undergraduate STEM education and research at Historically Black Colleges and Universities as a means to broaden participation in the nation's STEM workforce. HBCU-UP realizes this purpose by providing awards to develop, implement, and study innovative models and approaches for making dramatic improvements in the preparation and success of HBCU undergraduate students so that they may participate successfully in graduate programs and/or careers in STEM disciplines.

HBCU-UP provides support for a variety of opportunities. These include:

Targeted Infusion Projects, Broadening Participation Research Projects, Implementation Projects, and Achieving Competitive Excellence Implementation Projects: These projects aim to support efforts that increase STEM participation at HBCUs. See the website for individual project descriptions. The deadline to submit a required notice of intent for these projects is Sept. 6, 2016. Full proposals are due Nov. 22, 2016.

Broadening Participation Research Centers: These centers represent the collective intelligence of HBCU STEM higher education and serve as the national hubs for the rigorous study and broad dissemination of the critical pedagogies and culturally sensitive interventions that contribute to the success of HBCUs in educating African-American STEM undergraduates. Centers are expected to conduct research on STEM education and broadening participation in STEM; perform outreach to HBCUs to build capacity for conducting this type of research; and work to transfer and disseminate promising participation-broadening research to enhance STEM education and research outcomes for African-American undergraduates across the country. The preliminary proposal deadline for this opportunity is March 21, 2017. Full proposals are due Nov. 22, 2017.

For more information on the overall Historically Black Colleges and Universities -- Undergraduate Program, visit http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=5481.

Please direct questions about these opportunities to Claudia Rankins at crankins@nsf.gov and Andrea Johnson at andjohns@nsf.gov.

Deadline:

Tuesday, March 21, 2017

Opportunity Category:

National Science Foundation's Historically Black Colleges and Universities -- Undergraduate Program

The National Science Foundation is seeking proposals for the Historically Black Colleges and Universities -- Undergraduate Program. HBCU-UP is committed to enhancing the quality of undergraduate STEM education and research at Historically Black Colleges and Universities as a means to broaden participation in the nation's STEM workforce.

The National Science Foundation is seeking proposals for the Historically Black Colleges and Universities -- Undergraduate Program. HBCU-UP is committed to enhancing the quality of undergraduate STEM education and research at Historically Black Colleges and Universities as a means to broaden participation in the nation's STEM workforce. HBCU-UP realizes this purpose by providing awards to develop, implement, and study innovative models and approaches for making dramatic improvements in the preparation and success of HBCU undergraduate students so that they may participate successfully in graduate programs and/or careers in STEM disciplines.

HBCU-UP provides support for a variety of opportunities. These include:

Targeted Infusion Projects, Broadening Participation Research Projects, Implementation Projects, and Achieving Competitive Excellence Implementation Projects: These projects aim to support efforts that increase STEM participation at HBCUs. See the website for individual project descriptions. The deadline to submit a required notice of intent for these projects is Sept. 6, 2016. Full proposals are due Nov. 22, 2016.

Broadening Participation Research Centers: These centers represent the collective intelligence of HBCU STEM higher education and serve as the national hubs for the rigorous study and broad dissemination of the critical pedagogies and culturally sensitive interventions that contribute to the success of HBCUs in educating African-American STEM undergraduates. Centers are expected to conduct research on STEM education and broadening participation in STEM; perform outreach to HBCUs to build capacity for conducting this type of research; and work to transfer and disseminate promising participation-broadening research to enhance STEM education and research outcomes for African-American undergraduates across the country. The preliminary proposal deadline for this opportunity is March 21, 2017. Full proposals are due Nov. 22, 2017.

For more information on the overall Historically Black Colleges and Universities -- Undergraduate Program, visit http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=5481.

Please direct questions about these opportunities to Claudia Rankins at crankins@nsf.gov and Andrea Johnson at andjohns@nsf.gov.

Deadline:

Tuesday, September 6, 2016

Opportunity Category:

Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Program Accepting Applications for 2017-2018 Fellowship Year

The Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Program provides a unique opportunity for accomplished K-12 educators in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics to serve in the national education arena. Fellows spend 11 months working in a federal agency or U.S. congressional office to bring their extensive classroom knowledge and experience to efforts related to STEM education programs and policy.

The Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Program provides a unique opportunity for accomplished K-12 educators in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics to serve in the national education arena. Fellows spend 11 months working in a federal agency or U.S. congressional office to bring their extensive classroom knowledge and experience to efforts related to STEM education programs and policy.

To be eligible, applicants must be U.S. citizens who are currently employed full time in a U.S. public or private elementary or secondary school or school district. Applicants must have been teaching full time in a public or private elementary or secondary school for at least five of the last seven years in a STEM discipline.

Current sponsoring agencies included NASA, the U.S. Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation. The DOE sponsors up to four placements in U.S. congressional offices.

The Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Program is managed by the DOE Office of Science through its Office of Workforce Development for Teachers and Scientists, in collaboration with the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education and partnering federal agencies.

Program applications are due Nov. 17, 2016, at 8 p.m. EST and must be submitted through an online application system.

Additional information about the program, including eligibility requirements, program benefits, application requirements and access to the online application system, may be found at http://science.energy.gov/wdts/einstein/.

Please direct inquiries about the Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Program to sc.einstein@science.doe.gov.

Deadline:

Thursday, November 17, 2016

Opportunity Category:

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